LORE: Warriors of the Realms

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LORE: Warriors of the Realms

Postby Harroghty » Mon Nov 23, 2015 2:44 am

This thread will include regional notes about warriors from around the Realms. The sourcebook used for these is noted below, but this will be the first of a few threads aimed at making setting appropriate character concepts more available to new players (or veterans who maybe had not considered some of these roles).

Sources:
Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of The Realms. Lake Geneva: TSR, 1996.

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"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
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Warriors of Cormyr

Postby Harroghty » Mon Nov 23, 2015 2:58 am

Overview
The nation of Cormyr is a vast, old, civilized kingdom where independent adventurers are frowned upon. Cormyreans see adventurers as eccentrics, and to them the notion of adventuring for profit or fame is a throwback to more barbarous days. However, a warrior who fights to right wrongs and bring a civilizing influence to others is accepted. Thus, a warrior of Cormyr can be a fighter of unquestionable principles with grace and skill enough to silence his critics. Most often, fighters of such caliber in Cormyr who believe in a cause beyond themselves wear the tunics of Purple Dragons. The Purple Dragons are King Azoun's army, a well-trained force known for its staunch defense of the king's laws and will. Many of Cormyr's young boys dream of one day marching under the Purple Dragon's standard.[/quote]

Description
In many ways, warriors of Cormyr are the embodiment of the "classic" warrior. They tend to favor the best types of armor money can buy, usually splint or plate. If the individual Cormyrean warrior is one to eschew heavy armor, the warrior wears well-made but functional cloaks and other finery. Coats of arms are a popular adornment, worn either on a tabard over armor, or emblazoned on a shield. Purple Dragons wear field plate armor and steel helms when they are adventuring abroad. A tabard decorated with a rampant purple dragon proclaims their allegiance to the King's personal army.[/quote]

Role-Playing
A typical Cormyrean warrior comes from a powerful, civilized nation, and he or she knows it. Even if they are not all paragons of virtue, Cormyrean warriors conduct themselves with honor, pride, and style. Cormyrean warriors pride themselves on their civilized behavior, which includes knowledge of social etiquette to serve them in any social or political situation. Unfortunately, Cormyrean warriors also tend to be arrogant, talking down to those who they consider “less refined ” or “less civilized.” They also decry those whose motives may be less noble than their own. Ofttimes, this arrogance is unintentional, and not meant as an insult.

Purple Dragons, whether adventuring on Cormyr’'s frontiers or beyond, are disciplined warriors whose military bearing is always obvious. They know that their ultimate allegiance is to King Azoun and the nation of Cormyr as a whole. Like the independent civilian warriors, national pride runs strong and deep, coloring most of their actions.

N.B. The numerical bonuses or penalities listed here do not apply in FK, but are included for context.


Special Advantages
Cormyrean Warriors
Cormyrean warriors get the etiquette nonweapon proficiency as a bonus. If the warrior finds himself in a social situation in a strange land far from home, the warrior can still attempt an etiquette proficiency check (with a -4 penalty), to “fake his way” through the social customs to avoid any unintentional insults.

Due to the prosperity of their kingdom, Cormyrean warriors start out with a little more money than the typical warrior (6d4x10 gold pieces).

Purple Dragons
Purple Dragon warriors are given a light warhorse, field plate armor, and the choice of a melee weapon, usually a long sword. This equipment is in addition to the etiquette nonweapon proficiency and the extra starting money bonuses.

A Purple Dragon warrior of 5th level or higher can request overnight shelter and food from Cormyrean lords or nobles. Depending on a character’s fame, he could get lodgings in either the manor or the stables.

When a Purple Dragon warrior reaches 9th level, he or she can place their family’s coat of arms somewhere on their garb, armor, or shield. Most often, the design is placed in a shield on the breast of the rampant dragon seal all Purple Dragons wear. Warriors who do this get a +2 reaction bonus when dealing with Cormyreans at home or abroad. They also increase their chances of instant recognition.

When fighting within Cormyr’'s borders, all Purple Dragon warriors gain a +2 bonus for their morale checks, as they fight directly for king and country. Optionally, this bonus can extend to situations where either the King himself or a high-ranking noble is part of the attacking force anywhere in the Realms.

Special Disadvantages
Warriors of Cormyr
Warriors of Cormyr must be of good alignment to reflect their love of Cormyr and all it stands for.

Thieves are something a Cormyrean warrior cannot tolerate, and it shows on their faces and how they talk to them. When interacting with thieves, all reaction rolls are penalized at -4.

The arrogance of Cormyrean warriors is a sore point to other folk, especially those not from an urban environment. When mingling with non-Cormyreans, all reaction rolls are penalized at -2.

The nation of Cormyr has made many enemies during its long history, and King Azoun continues his opposition to these enemies to the present. Opponents from Zhentil Keep, Hillsfar, Mulmaster, Thay, and the Cult of the Dragon will focus on killing a Cormyrean warrior over any other warrior in battle except for warriors from Shadowdale.

Purple Dragons
Not only do Purple Dragon warriors suffer the same hindrances as the civilian warriors of Cormyr, but extra burdens are put upon them.

Purple Dragon warriors are, above all else, part of Cormyr'’s army. As such, their desires and goals are subordinate to the Crown. Adventuring Purple Dragon warriors are on “detached duty,” which often ends as quickly as it begins.

If a Purple Dragon’'s superiors command him not to go somewhere, he does not go. Period. This likelihood increases if the superiors somehow hear that the warrior is doing something which could potentially hurt King Azoun or Cormyr as a whole.

Any Cormyrean citizen can ask a Purple Dragon warrior for aid if attacked. Since Purple Dragons are also responsible for maintaining domestic tranquility, this means that they are immediately responsible (after any local militia or constabulary) for fighting off brigands, rescuing citizenry from bandits, and dealing with monsters and border incursions.

There is no such warrior kit as an “Ex-Purple Dragon”. Purple Dragons who are drummed out of the army or retire from it lose their equipment and any benefits. Purple Dragons who leave their commissions in the army are automatically reduced in status to the independent Cormyrean warriors.

Source:
Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of The Realms. Lake Geneva: TSR, 1996.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
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Warriors of Waterdeep

Postby Harroghty » Mon Nov 23, 2015 3:11 am

Overview
Waterdeep is rightfully called the City of Splendors. So many diverse cultures come together here unlike any where else in all the Realms. As a result, the Waterdhavian warrior has been exposed to a wide variety of experiences and cultures. One cannot help but become more refined and well-rounded when living in Waterdeep for any amount of time.

Description
Although the plethora of cultures in Waterdeep practically guarantees that no two warriors will be dressed the same, there are certain generalities that can be legitimately ascribed to Waterdhavian warriors. A true warrior of Waterdeep likes to see and be seen. Most strive for the finest clothing in the latest styles mixed with a martial undercurrent (decorations on armor or weapons). This tells all who see the warrior that he is civilized, successful, and can carry himself well in a fight. A warrior needs not only fight well, but he writing needs to look good while fighting as well.

Waterdhavian warriors also tend to be better groomed and bathe more often than others around the Savage Frontier. It is no surprise that many noble warriors and swashbucklers are found in Waterdeep.

Role-Playing
Waterdeep is a cosmopolitan city, and the true Waterdhavian warrior knows it. Most natives, and certainly the warriors, take pride (some say arrogance) in being from the City of Splendors.

Warriors of this kit know the latest gossip, the newest fashions, the most intriguing new philosophies, as well as the latest word on the accomplishments of other fighters and adventurers in the Realms.

The Waterdhavian fighter also has a jaded, “been there, done that” attitude towards many things, including magic. There is little magic, common or exotic, in the Realms that a native of Waterdeep has not seen a number of times before, given the number of adventurers and wizards throughout the city.

Finally, the Waterdhavian warriors are polite (but not always well-mannered), articulate, well-educated, and very civilized. They tend to look down on those who are not similarly gifted.

N.B. The numerical bonuses or penalities listed here do not apply in FK, but are included for context.


Special Advantages
A warrior of Waterdeep spends a good amount of time in the city, and therefore gets the local history nonweapon proficiency (applicable only to the Waterdeep area) for free.

In addition, the exposure to so many cultures and ideas makes for quite an expansive base of knowledge. Thus, a warrior of Waterdeep may make a proficiency check to attempt a General or Warrior skill even if he does not have the particular nonweapon proficiency. Alternately, if the Waterdhavian is a paladin or ranger, he can also use this for Priest or Wizard skill groups respectively. When attempting a nonweapon proficiency in which the warrior is not proficient, the proficiency check is rolled, but with a -4 penalty assessed against the appropriate ability score. Note that this penalty is cumulative with the normal modifiers for the appropriate proficiency.

A warrior of Waterdeep may also select any languages indigenous to the surface Realms, human or otherwise, no matter how exotic. Waterdhavians will always have at least Common as a language.

Lastly, a warrior of Waterdeep is not subject to the doubled slot cost for learning additional nonweapon proficiencies outside his initial groups. Note that this bonus does not come into play until after the warrior has begun adventuring. Also, the warrior must find someone willing to teach him the proficiency; these skills, while more easily learned, cannot simply be “picked up” without an explanation in a campaign.

Special Disadvantages
As they say, “a little knowledge is a dangerous thing,” and no one personifies this better than a warrior of Waterdeep. There is no danger in using learned skills, but the “intuitive” proficiencies are dangerous. If a warrior gets a 20 on a nonweapon proficiency roll when attempting to try a skill he does not know, it is not only a failure, it’s a potentially catastrophic failure. A failed fire-building attempt may set the warrior himself on fire, while a failed tracking attempt may make the warrior think he’s tracking an orc, until he finds it is actually a vampire!

The Waterdhavian “big city” demeanor is not appreciated by more rural folk. When dealing with NPCs in rustic areas, the Waterdhavian suffers a -2 penalty to reaction
rolls. In addition, DMs may extend this penalty when the warrior deals with Harpers.

In addition, Calishites are less than impressed with Waterdeep'’s extravagant claims. To the average Calishites, their own cities are just as big and splendid, if not more so. When interacting with Calishites, warriors of Waterdeep suffer a -3 penalty to reaction rolls.

Finally, Waterdeep is the gathering area for many of the movers and shakers in the Realms who are on the side of good. In fact, the city is the center of the Lords'’ Alliance, a trade-based pact which includes cities such as Silverymoon, Neverwinter, and Baldur’'s Gate and vows to oppose the Zhentarim and other evil groups. Organizations such as the Knights of the Shield, the Shadow Thieves, and the Zhentarim will keep a close eye on Waterdhavian warriors, making the assumption that such a warrior is somehow involved with the Lords’' Alliance. This “"close eye"” can be manifested in the form of a trailing spy, magical surveillance, or even outright capture and interrogation by said groups.

A Word About Wards
The kit presented here is a warrior from the more civilized, cultivated, and richer wards of this vast city (North Ward, Sea Ward, Castle Ward). There are wards, however, like Dock Ward and South Ward, where adventurers will find that ruthless traders and thieves, murderers and conmen, and any number of mercenaries can be found here just like any other city.

A warrior from Waterdeep can certainly be from Dock or Southern Ward. In that case, the beginning warrior starts with none of the advantages listed in the above kit. Instead, the warrior has an intimate knowledge of the ward that he is from ("“I know these docks like th'’ back o'’ me hand!”") and one bonus Rogue proficiency (singleslot proficiency only).

Additionally, the warrior “knows someone”. This “someone” is an NPC of 1d4+2 levels of any one character class. This NPC can provide a favor (fence goods, sell stolen goods, provide a hideout from the Watch) for the PC once a month. Any favors beyond that require a favor in return. This NPC will never risk her life for the warrior.

Source:
Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of The Realms. Lake Geneva: TSR, 1996.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
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Warriors of the Western Heartlands

Postby Harroghty » Sat Dec 05, 2015 4:25 pm

Overview
Warriors of the Western Heartlands are as independent as the geographical locations they hail from. There is no one feature that links the natives of these lands save trade from the east going across the major routes to Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate.

Description
There is no set look for warriors of the Western Heartlands, and they would argue with anyone who suggests otherwise. Each individual wears what makes him or her comfortable, thus clothing and armor tends to be functional and pleasing to personal tastes.

Role-Playing
Take the Dragon Coast's dislike of government beyond the local level and double it. That is close to the attitude of many warriors of the Western Heartlands are like. This is supported by the fact that there are only independent towns and cities, no countries, west of Anauroch.

Western Heartlands warriors are stubborn, hardheaded, fiercely self-sufficient, and proudly independent. Once a Western Heartland warrior gets an idea or a goal in his head, he will not be deterred.

Despite this, warriors of the Western Heartlands are very friendly and open, and are perfect tavern partners, boisterous and generous. And so they remain until talk
turns to politics or other serious topics.

N.B. The numerical bonuses or penalities listed here do not apply in FK, but are included for context.


Special Advantages
No matter where in the Western Heartlands warriors are from, their mule-headed stubbornness serves them well. All Western Heartland warriors gain a +1 bonus to disbelieve illusions (saving throw vs. spell) and a +1 saving throw bonus against fear.

Asbraun
Warriors of Asbraun are all member of the Riders in Red Cloaks. Each warrior gets a free medium war horse, spear, long sword, chain mail armor, and the obligatory red cloak.

Baldur's Gate
Baldur's Gate is a trading crossroads for the Realms. Warriors can pick up information about the many different cities and nations whose caravans and citizens pass
through Baldur's Gate. When a warrior of Baldur's Gate goes to any city, he can make an ability check against his Intelligence to recall a scrap of knowledge or trivia that can aid him in that city. It can be knowledge of how to best deal with the locals, or perhaps the warrior knows how to find his way within strange territory. This check can be made once per day per city.

Candlekeep
Candlekeep is a city of much stored knowledge and sages. All natives, including the warriors, benefit from this. When selecting initial nonweapon proficiencies, any Warrior or General skill costs only one slot, and any Priest or Wizard proficiencies only cost two slots no matter what their normal cost.

Elturel
Warriors of Elturel are members of the Hell Riders of Elturel, an elite company of warriors. Warriors receive a suit of crimson and white plate mail and a light warhorse with their commissions.

Evereska
This elven refuge is populated only by elves and all warriors must be of the majority race of moon elves; more than 80% of the population are moon elves and the remainder
are gold elves or visitors of other races. Each gets the airborne riding and the elvish language proficiencies for free.

Iriaebor
Iriaebor is a city of trade, and its stock in trade is fine mounts. All warriors get a choice of one of the following free nonweapon proficiencies: animal handling, blacksmithing,
or land-based riding.

Special Disadvantages

Asbraun
If a Red Cloak travels to the Moonsea, Dalelands, or Elven Court, there is a 40% chance that ignorant folk will confuse the Red Cloak for a Hillsfar Red Plume. If NPCs are enemies of the Red Cloaks, this could be very bad indeed. In addition, Asbraun warriors are especially known for their defiance of authority. Encounters with a city's guard, watch, or other city officials are penalized at a -4 to NPC reactions.

Baldur's Gate
Not all the tales that filter through Baldur's Gate are true. Therefore, the special nonweapon proficiency of a Baldur's Gate native suffers a -2 penalty against his Intelligence
check, due to either misconception or misinformation. In essence, the warrior knows false information. If a 20 is rolled in the proficiency check, the false information leads to a catastrophic result (A warrior "knows" a certain person is an assassin, but he is actually a retired guard captain!).

Candlekeep
All warriors must have minimum Intelligence and Wisdom scores of 12. All natives of Candlekeep are educated with some of the stored wisdom and learning in the city. Even the staunchest warrior with no interest in scholarly pursuits has to have some knowledge rub off on him.

Elturel
All Hell Riders must give 10% of all their earnings back to the city'?s coffers. Furthermore, there are no former members of the Hell Riders, since so many die in battle. Those who wish to resign are given difficult tasks for their final missions; if they succeed, a Hell Rider can resign, but the warrior is stripped of equipment and exiled from Elturel as a heretic in the eyes of Helm, god of duty, for abandoning his post.

Evereska
Due to their isolation, the only two languages an Evereskan warrior starts with are Common and Elvish. Furthermore, one initial weapon proficiency must be either the long bow or short bow.

Iriaebor
The competitive mercantile atmosphere of Iriaebor affects even the warriors. Not satisfied with the asking price of an item, a warrior of Iriaebor must make an ability check against Wisdom whenever buying an item or hiring services such as a room. If the check is failed, the warrior will be compelled to haggle for the price, with a goal of getting at least a 10% discount on the price.

Source:
Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of The Realms. Lake Geneva: TSR, 1996.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
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