Knights.

To share knowledge about the world and links to useful resources.

Knights.

Postby Harroghty » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:11 pm

Here are a few good resources that you might enjoy if you have a cavalier, knight, or paladin. Enjoy.
Updated 2 June 2014. Links verified 27 June 2012.

Web sites:

http://www.arador.com/main/index.html
(A well-researched resource for armor from the Middle Ages.)

http://www.chronique.com/
(A site affiliated with books I personally recommend highly, The Chivalry Bookshelf. Down on 27 June, 2012! Probably not coming back.)

--> http://www.chronique.com/Library/Glossa ... ssindx.htm
(A glossary of particular utility that is found on that site. Down on 27 June, 2012! Probably not coming back.)

--> http://revival.us/chroniquebackissues.aspx
(Back issues of the out-of-print "Chronique" magazine are sold here. Many are out of print entirely.)

http://www.fordham.edu/Halsall/sbook1k.asp
(See particularly the section on "Crusades" and "Crusader Orders".)

http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossa.htm
(All manner of heraldic terms and blazons explained.)

http://heraldry.sca.org/primer/
(Society for Creative Anachronism's heraldry "how-to")

http://www.the-orb.net/index.html
(Particularly this: http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religio ... _rule.html)
(See also this: http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religio ... ights.html)

http://www.candlekeep.com/library/artic ... hthood.htm
(Unofficial knightly orders in FR.)

http://www.candlekeep.com/library/articles/prc.htm
(A listing of prestige classes [to include many orders] with their canon source cited.)

http://www.armor.com/ or http://www.albion-swords.com/
(Excellent modern reproductions [using traditional methods] as a reference.)

http://www.thearma.org/essays.htm
(Awesome collection of essays from the Association of Renaissance Martial Arts [this the group that employs Western Martial Arts [WMA] and historical research instead of just play-fighting and dressing up].)

http://www.oakeshott.org/
(Ewart Oakeshott was the giant of research into WMA and swords.)

http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/c ... ID=4&dd1=4
(An example of the results of a search for "Armor" in the "Works of Art" category. This museum has one of the best public collections of arms and armor on display in the United States.)

http://ejmas.com/jwma/jwmaframe.htm
(Awesome scholarly journal about WMA.)

http://labyrinth.georgetown.edu/
(Medieval studies search engine maintained by Georgetown University in Washington, DC, USA.)

http://www.aemma.org/misc/medievalTournament.htm
(How-to hold a tournament. Academy of European Medieval Martial Arts.)

http://www.deremilitari.org/
(De Re Militari: The Society for Medieval Military History)

http://www.fleurdelis.com/meanings.htm
(Fleur-de-Lis Designs. A merchant site with some creative blazon interpretations. Thanks to Kerrick for this one.)

http://www.medievalists.net/
(An okay site. Dig around to find something worthwhile; a lot of very shallow history here.)

http://www.medart.pitt.edu/_medart/menu ... /INDEX.HTM
(A fantastic site displaying and defining medieval architecture terminology.)

Real books that I recommend (this is not an endorsement of any sellers, just a reference):

Book of Knighthood and Chivalry: With the Anonymous Ordene De Chevalerie (Paperback) by Ramon Lull
http://www.amazon.com/Book-Knighthood-C ... 436&sr=1-1

Jousts and Tournaments: Charny and the Rules for Chivalric Sport in Fourteenth-Century France (Hardcover) by Geoffroi De Charny (Author), Steven Muhlberger (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/Jousts-Tournament ... pd_sim_b_5

The Royal Book of Horsemanship, Jousting & Knightly Combat: Dom Duarte's 1438 Livro da Ensinana de Bem Cavalgar Toda Sela (Hardcover) by Dom Duarte (Author), Steven Muhlberger (Editor), Antonio Frano Preto (Translator)
http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Horsemanshi ... pd_sim_b_1

A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry (The Middle Ages Series) (Paperback)
by Geoffroi de Charny (Author), Richard W. Kaeuper (Introduction), Elspeth Kennedy (Translator)
http://www.amazon.com/Knights-Book-Chiv ... pd_sim_b_4

The Service of Ladies: An Autobiography (First Person Singular) (Paperback)
by Ulrich von Liechtenstein (Author), Kelly DeVries (Introduction), J. W. Thomas (Translator)
http://www.amazon.com/Service-Ladies-Au ... 633&sr=1-1

A Knight and His Weapons (Paperback)
by Ewart Oakeshott (Author) or any other title from this series
http://www.amazon.com/Knight-His-Weapon ... 683&sr=1-3

William Marshal: The Flower of Chivalry (Paperback)
by Georges Duby (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/William-Marshal-C ... 047&sr=8-2

Dragon Magazine #299 "Fight with Honor!, Knights & Paladins, Jousting Rules"
http://www.nobleknight.com/ProductDetai ... GenreID_E_

Empires Trilogy, The Crusade by James Lowder (Forgotten Realms book on how things DID NOT happen EVER in medieval warfare.)
http://www.nobleknight.com/ProductDetai ... GenreID_E_

Swords from the West (Paperback)
by Harold Lamb (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/Swords-West-Harol ... 460&sr=8-1

The Deed of Paksenarrion (Paperback) (Recommended to me by Mask himself. Fantastic fantasy book about a young woman's transformation into a paladin.)
by Elizabeth Moon (author)
http://www.amazon.com/The-Deed-Paksenar ... ksenarrion

Ivanhoe
by Sir Walter Scott (author)
Recommend a free download from iBooks

Movies that I recommend (a mix of accuracy and inspiration):

The War Lord (1965) - Heston, Boone
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059896/
Engaging story with a high (relative) degree of historical accuracy.


Excalibur (1981) - Terry, Mirren
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082348/
A classic. Terrible adherence to history, but entertaining none-the-less.


Henry V (1989) - Branagh, Jacobi
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097499/
A classic, but also has value in showing the oft unreported side of being a knight - war.


El Cid (1961) - Heston, Loren
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054847/
A classic.


A Knight's Tale (2001) - Ledger, Sewell
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0183790/
This movie is entertaining and funny, but obviously not intended as historical gospel. If anything, it does provide a decent picture of a tournament though.


Kingdom of Heaven (2005) - Bloom, Neeson
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0320661/
This movie's scenery is as beautiful as its historical revision is revolting. Ridley Scott continues to try to paint the Crusades as an act of European imperialism and aggression and gets away with it because most people do not know any better. Enjoy the movie and then read this article.


Ironclad (2011) - Purefoy, Giamatti, Jacobi
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1233301/
Similar to The War Lord in many ways, this movie shows a Templar leading the defense of a besieged castle. It is interesting to see Purefoy's portrayal of the Templar trying to keep his vows. I believe that this would useful for a player of a paladin as it demonstrates the restraint necessary in many cases, and the consequences of laxity.
Last edited by Harroghty on Tue May 19, 2009 3:02 pm, edited 10 times in total.
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Re: Knights.

Postby Harroghty » Fri Jan 16, 2009 2:23 pm

I will continue to update this as a reference for the interested. If you try a link and it does not work then I invite people to PM me and report this (I will find another one to replace it if need be) or post here with a valid one if you come across one.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
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Knights's Titles

Postby Harroghty » Mon Jan 26, 2009 6:09 pm

The policy of dubbing female knights "lady" is one that I was curious about. I have done some research and included it in the below bit about titles, post-nominals, and forms of address. (This is generally referring to the British system and/or the English language.)

Sir is used in Forgotten Kingdoms for male knights and is the standard title both in history and in current orders (Order of the Garter, Order of the Thistle, Order of Saint Patrick, and others).

Lady is used in Forgotten Kingdoms for female knights and is the standard title in current orders for the wives of knights in British orders (since the 17th century when the wife of a knight in any British order was called "Dame"). Historically, lady is the proper term for any woman of rank above knight (women were not dubbed knights generally) or any woman married to a man of rank. Today, female members of current orders are titled "dame" (such as Dame Judi Dench, Dame Jean Conan Doyle (deceased), or -Gwain's favorite- Dame Edna).
*edit: I found some female knightly orders from the Middle Ages. The Order of the Hatchet was founded in 1149 CE by Raymond Berenger, Count of Barcelona, to honor the defense of the town of Tortosa against the Moors. The original documents refer to the women in the Feminine conjugations of latin titles for knight. See here for more: http://www.heraldica.org/topics/orders/wom-kn.htm

Knights of both sexes (or any other office holder such as a judge) might be referred to as "Your Honor" or "Your Worship". (See also.)

In formal scenarios, a knight's name might be followed by an acronym called a "post-nominal" (appropriately enough). The post-nominals follow a precedence that really escapes utility in Forgotten Kingdoms but, essentially, names first, then titles, then orders. So Dame Edna, KE might be Dame Edna, Knight of the Eternal Order or Sir Steve, Bt. KG might be Sir Steve, Baronet of Nowheresville and Knight of the Golden Lion. (See also.)

(Game policy is such that ranks, titles of nobilty, and entrance to orders are subject to application and administrator approval. The use of titles is summarized nicely by Lathlain here.)
Last edited by Harroghty on Mon Feb 02, 2009 12:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Making a Knight

Postby Harroghty » Tue Jan 27, 2009 2:58 pm

Generally, there are two methods of making a knight: the accolade and an adoubement. The accolade is generally defined as a "ceremony conferring the honor of knighthood" and so can be loosely used to describe anytime someone is dubbed a knight. The adoubement is generally defined as "the girding of the military belt" (this belt is also called an adoubement or girtle), but has come to also mean the formal ceremony. Historically, being dubbed a knight wasn't necessarily required. In a world of decentralized government and a variety of authorities who were capable of conferring chivalry, there was not always a way to verify. In his article "Who is a Knight?", Brian R. Price simply says, "Nor was the ceremony an absolute requirement. If an armed man travelled far, and appeared a knight then de facto he was a knight." (1)

The accolade refers generally to the act of conferring a knighthood. Specifically, it is believed to refer to the blow (colée) given to the candidate to make their new duties memorable. This is also described as "the last blow the soldier would receive with impunity". (2) The distinction here is that the accolade refers only to the act of conferring knighthood and does not imply ceremony. It was often performed after battles. The last Frenchman knighted for success in battle was Montlue, who received it from the Duke d'Anguien at Cerisolles in 1544 CE(3), but it was commonplace by all nations such as at Poitiers (the one in 1356 CE) and Courtrai (in 1302 CE).

The adoubement refers specifically to the ceremony conferring knighthood as opposed to simply the act. The word is French and could be written in English as simply "dubbing" a man a knight. In 791 CE, Charlemagne ordered Prince Louis to be girded with a sword and Louis then did the same with his son Charles in 838 CE. The same is seen in the Bayeaux tapestry when it depicts Duke William of Normandy (then "the Bastard", later "the Conquerer") making Earl Harold Godwinson a knight with the legend "Hic Wilelemus dedit Haroldo arma" or "Here William gave arms to Harold".(4) The adoubement ceremony involves giving arms, armor, and accoutrements to the candidate for knighthood as symbols of their new duties. (5) The ceremony also became a vehicle of control for the church by becoming a kind of religious authorization to bear arms. (6)

This is all a very brief contrast of the differences between the two methods. In light of the differences, it seems to me that knighthood conferred on squires (that are candidates for becoming a paladin) in Forgotten Kingdoms would be best suited by adoubements (this website has a good example) considering the ecclesiastical nature of their service, but accolades also work well in some scenarios. It would certainly be exciting to see a squire made a knight after an exciting battle (PvP or simply the squire making an imporant moral victory).


1
Price, Brian R. "Who is a Knight." Chronique. 24 January, 1998. <http://www.chronique.com/Library/Knights/Whatknit.htm> (27 January, 2009).

2
Mills, Charles. The History of Chivalry: Or, Knighthood and Its Times. Lea and Blanchard, 1844.

3
Ibid.

4
Stephenson, Carl. Medieval Feudalism. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1956.

5
Ridyard, Susan Janet. Chivalry, Knighthood, and War in the Middle Ages. University of the South Press, 1999.

6
Kaeuper, Richard W. Chivalry and violence in medieval Europe. Oxford University Press, 2001.

*A note of clarity: I use the BCE (Before Common Era) and CE (Common Era) notations for dates. These use the same calendar system as BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini). The accuracy of the dates implied in the BC/AD system has not been verified and thus it is more correct, and more secular, to use Common Era.
Last edited by Harroghty on Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Armor

Postby Harroghty » Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:54 pm

If you have ever looked at a piece of armor in game and wondered "What is that?" then these diagrams should be helpful. Some general comments on armor:

-Armor of the Middle Ages was long believed to be made of iron. It turns out that only munitions grade (very low quality) items were; most armor was made from steel.
Check out: Johnson, Craig. "Some Aspects of the Metallurgy and Production of European Armor" in Armored Proceedings Symposium Notes (1999).

-There is no such thing as "chainmail" this is redundant and it's a silly invention of 18th century authors. The term is "mail" (as in "a coat of mail") and it is defined as "armor that was flexible, consisting of rings linked together or of small exterior plates".

-Plate mail is another term without historical basis. Plate armor is described as a "coat of plates" and a suit of armor is known traditionally as a harness. i.e. "A plate harness" or a "mail harness".

-After the late fourteenth century, the term vambrace usually meant armor covering the entire arm. The term "bracer" frequently used in Forgotten Kingdoms is derived from the earlier meaning of vambrace (that is armor for the forearms).

-Armor worn without any covering is said to be "alwhyte" or white. A man often covers his armor with a surcoat or jupon (also called a tabard or coat-of-arms). The former is a lot like a traditional nightshirt and the latter fits more closely and often features the devices (heraldry) of the wearer. A horse's armor is covered by a caparison.

-On the subject of horses: horse armor is barding (generally) or a bard (singular). A mail bard is more than just the fellow potentially giving you amorous looks from across the tavern's common room. One might say "I prefer mail barding" and be answered "Yes, but I still enjoy my horse's plate bard."

-Someone posed a question about the diagrams and the "bevor". According to Ewart Oakeshott, this can be spelled "bevor", "beavor", or "beaver". In Hamlet, the dead king is so described: "He wore his beaver up".
Check out: Oakeshott, Ewart. A Knight and His Armor. Chester Springs: Dufour Editions, 1999.

*The below are displayed without authorization because their original source is unknown to me. At least one looks to be the work of the late author and illustrator Ewart Oakeshott.



Image
Image
Image
Last edited by Harroghty on Thu Feb 05, 2009 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Horses

Postby Harroghty » Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:08 am

The horse is almost as intrinsic a part of the knight's equipment as his sword or his armor. Probably the most detailed, authentic text on the subject from the period in question is often called simply Bem Cavalgar (the full title translates as "The Art of Riding in Every Saddle") and was written by King Dom Duarte of Portugal in 1438. I recommend the whole book to anyone who is curious about how knight's rode in war and the tournament (or any other time), but I will name the author's six basic rules here:
1.To stay firm and erect on the saddle in everything you do
2.To press your legs against the beast
3.To have your feet firm in the stirrups
4.To know how and when to use your hands
5.To know the best way to ride, specific to each saddle, in accordance to its type and preparation, in order to stay mounted as strongly as possible
6.To know how to correct yourself, the saddle, and the stirrups better to manage every action you need to take, in accordance with the beast's behavior.

Duarte, King of Portugal. The Royal Book of Jousting, Horsemanship, and Knightly Combat: a Translation into English of King Dom Duarte's 1438 Treatise Livro da ensinanca de bem cavalgar toda sela (The Art of Riding in Every Saddle). trans. Antonio Franco Preto. ed. Steven Muhlberger. Highland Village: The Chivalry Bookshelf, 2005.


Also, if your character is attempting to make a charge on horseback with a lance: their legs must be straight or it would end very badly for them in real life. The idea of the cavalry charge with the lance is to communicate the horse's momentum through the rider and through their lance, into the enemy. Thus, the idea is to stand up straight in the stirrups and brace yourself against a high-backed saddle to force the momentum to go with you. If this technique is not applied it throws the rider to nasty and probably fatal results.

Finally, here are the parts of a horse for your reference:

Image

*This image is used without authorization as its source is unknown.
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Re: Knights.

Postby Jaenoic » Wed Jan 28, 2009 3:49 am

Let me say thank you very much to Harroghty for taking the time and effort to post this. Many of us who enjoy playing characters of knightly paths unfortunately do not have the OOC knowledge of period arms and armor that our characters understandably would. I feel that sharing this sort of knowledge will really help enrich the quality of playing our knightly characters. Thanks, Harroghty!
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Re: Knights.

Postby Horace » Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:17 am

Just want to second Jaenoic's sentiments. But for the record, I will never call anything Kallias wears "a beaver".
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Daily Life of Knights

Postby Harroghty » Wed Jan 28, 2009 6:41 pm

The question was posed to me: "What did knights do day to day?"

This question has a couple of sides. The activities of knights varies wildly between types of knights and then between different orders and nationalities. I will approach the question by looking at the types most similiar to what might be found in Forgotten Kingdoms: the monastic knight and the errant. I define monastic knights here as those knights in orders with a monastic rule (the Hospitalers, Templars, and Teutonic knights for example) and I define errants as independent warriors out for adventure (Ulrich von Lichenstein is a perfect example).

Articles follow...
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Monastic Knights

Postby Harroghty » Wed Jan 28, 2009 6:42 pm

The monastic knights served in orders with harsh, monastic rules and defininate purposes (I will use the common names for these orders for clarity here. Templars instead of Knights of the Temple, etc.). These orders were all founded with purposes beyond what is popularly portrayed. The Council of Clermont in 1095 called the crusaders out to defend Christian lands beset by Muslim armies. So the men in these sorts of monastic orders were giving up their lives at home in order to join orders whose bywords were poverty and hardship in the defence of others.(1) The Teutonic Knights were founded when "a band of good people from Bremen and from Lübeck, who, through the charity of our Lord, took pity on the manifold needs of the sick in the army and started the aforementioned hospital under a sail of a ship" (2)and thus had a similar mission to the Hospitalers of St.John. Archbishop William of Tyre writes that in 1119 the Templars took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, and Patriarch Warmund of Jerusalem commanded them, `in remission of their sins', to defend the pilgrim routes from bandits.(3) So the first thing that we know about the daily activities of these sorts of knights is that they had a day job working in a hospital, defending one, defending pilgrims, fighting in battle with their order, and doing other similar tasks.

These men had much of their activity dictated by the the strict rules that they were governed by. The Teutonic Knights, a relatively lax order in comparison, allowed its members two meals a day, plain clothes only, no payment but charity, and ordered them to traditional monastic prayer times (lauds, vespers, and compline).(4) The more harshly governed Templars are directed thusly,
"They live as brothers in joyful and sober company, without wives or children. So that their evangelical perfection will lack nothing, they dwell united in one family with no personal property whatever, careful to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. They never sit in idleness or wander about aimlessly, but on the rare occasions when they are not on duty, they are always careful to earn their bread by repairing their worn armor and torn clothing, or simply by setting things to order. For the rest, they are guided by the common needs and by the orders of their master."(5)

Beyond the general aims and purpose of their specific orders, each knight follows a monastic discipline and maintains those things that will allow him to complete his duties. In many situations these knights had men-at-arms and servants to stable their horses or men to cook their food, but they maintained their own gear and weapons.

The contemporary comments on these orders are also instructive. Complaints against these orders were largely based on their eventual (collective) wealth or the privileges that they enjoyed. These orders were exempted from tithes and certain taxes by many kings and feudal authorities. The complaints are helpful sources as often these men's behavior is cited an exception to a complaint about the church. In the mid-thirteenth century, an English critic published a poem titled 'Sur les Ètats du monde' that criticized the clergy and the church. It says this about the military orders:
The Templars are most doughty men,
And they certainly know how to provide for themselves,
But they love pennies too much.
When prices are high
They sell their wheat
Instead of giving it to their people.
Nor do the lords of the Hospital,
Have any desire for buying women`s services
If they have their palfreys and horses,
I don`t say it for any evil...(6)
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Monastic Knights 2

Postby Harroghty » Wed Jan 28, 2009 6:56 pm

These knights took joy in their labor and worked constantly under difficult conditions. Tasks were not too menial if they accomplished the mission of the respective orders. At first, these men lived very much like monks in their day-to-day lives, but did succumb to the wealth around them as time wore on.

1
Madden, Thomas F. "The Real History of the Crusades." The ARMA. 2000. <http://www.thearma.org/essays/Crusades.htm> (28 January 2009).
Pope Innocent III wrote:
How does a man love according to divine precept his neighbor as himself when, knowing that his Christian brothers in faith and in name are held by the perfidious Muslims in strict confinement and weighed down by the yoke of heaviest servitude, he does not devote himself to the task of freeing them? ...Is it by chance that you do not know that many thousands of Christians are bound in slavery and imprisoned by the Muslims, tortured with innumerable torments?
Professor Madden writes:
"Crusading," Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith has rightly argued, was understood as an "an act of love"—in this case, the love of one's neighbor. The Crusade was seen as an errand of mercy to right a terrible wrong. As Pope Innocent III wrote to the Knights Templar, "You carry out in deeds the words of the Gospel, 'Greater love than this hath no man, that he lay down his life for his friends.'"

2
Trans. Stern, Indrikis. "The Rule and Statutes of the Teutonic Knights." On-Line Reference Book for Medieval Studies. 1969. <http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religion/monastic/tk_rule.html> (28 January 2009).
3
Nicholson, Helen. "Knights of Christ? The Templars, Hospitallers and other military orders in the eyes of their contemporaries, 1128-1291." On-Line Reference Book for Medieval Studies. 1999. <http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religion/monastic/knights.html> (28 January 2009).
4
Trans. Stern, Indrikis. "The Rule and Statutes of the Teutonic Knights." On-Line Reference Book for Medieval Studies. 1969. <http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religion/monastic/tk_rule.html> (28 January 2009).
5
St. Bernard of Clairvaux. trans. Conrad Greenia "In Praise of the New Knighthood (Liber ad milites Templi: De laude novae militae)." On-Line Reference Book for Medieval Studies. 1977. <http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religion/monastic/bernard.html> (28 January 2009).
6
Nicholson, Helen. "Knights of Christ? The Templars, Hospitallers and other military orders in the eyes of their contemporaries, 1128-1291." On-Line Reference Book for Medieval Studies. 1999. <http://www.the-orb.net/encyclop/religion/monastic/knights.html> (28 January 2009).
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Re: Knights.

Postby Alfrid » Wed Jan 28, 2009 10:29 pm

Thanks for the notes on horsemanship. I'll have to look up the Bem Cavalgar -- it appears to be in the university library!
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A Day in the Life

Postby Harroghty » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:22 pm

The article on the daily activities of historical knights errant (and those from historical literary sources) is on hold pending the arrival of a book that I intended to cite. Meanwhiles, here are two sections from The Complete Paladin's Handbook (TSR 2147). These two "day-in-the-life" examples are all right but there are a few things that don't make sense. I have included them here with some commentary. The commas are plentiful, often unnecessary, and original to the author.

Sir Jounville (Stronghold Paladin)

Sir Jounville rises about an hour before dawn, awakening in his private quarters in the stronghold cellar. He washes in a ceramic basin of cold water, then dresses in a waist-length tunic with full sleeves, a short-sleeved tunic lined with fox fur, a loose mantle secured at the neck with a silver chain, linen hosiery, and leather boots. He visits the stronghold chapel for the morning prayer, then stops at the kitchen for a quick breakfast of bread and ale.

Jounville reports to the steward's quarters for a brief meeting to review the events of the day ahead. The steward reminds him of an important banquet that evening, a birthday celebration for the king's niece. Sir Jounville assures the steward that he'll be prompt.

Jounville joins three companions in the bailey for morning exercise, focusing today on weight lifting and archery practice. Meanwhile, other residents of the stronghold have risen and are beginning to fill the bailey. Maidens embroider tablecloths for the royal family, cooks roast mutton for the evening feast, and children play noisily with horseshoes and tops.

After two hours of exercise, Jounville walks to the stables to see if the groomsman has fitted his horse with new shoes. With winter approaching, Jounville wants to make sure the shoes have calkins, metallic points that enable the horse to grip the frozen ground. The groomsman has finished the work, and Jounville examines each shoe carefully, checking for rough edges, proper weight, and tight nail heads. Satisfied, Jounville thanks the groomsman for a job well done.

The time approaches for Jounville's guard duty. He returns to his quarters to don his chain mail armor and retrieve his shield, sword, longbow, and arrows. At the kitchen, he picks up a herring pie flavored with pepper and cinnamon that he'll eat later.

He climbs the ladder to the bastion tower and settles behind a narrow arrow slit. He peers through the slit, surveying the wide field that borders the stronghold's north wall. All is quiet. Sir Northram, whom Jounville is relieving, reports no disturbances on his watch.
(Okay. Stop. This book was written by Rick Swan. He's written a lot of books for TSR/WoTC and apparently has no basic knowledge of anything he's writing about. Sir Jounville must be the Gomer Pyle of his stronghold if they are putting him on duty watching through one rayere(arrow slit). Probably a lower-level knight would serve as the "guard chief" for a rotation of the watch and supervise a section of wall or the guard of the whole castle for that period; he would not have the requisite skills to deliver the necessary volume of fire with his bow and that sort of job is what men-at-arms are for anyway. Continue...)

For the next eight hours, Jounville stares silently through the slit, bow in hand, pausing only briefly in mid-afternoon to eat his herring pie. His watch is uneventful.

At five o'clock, Sir Inniss arrives to relieve Jounville. Jounville visits the chapel for an afternoon prayer, then goes back to his quarters to prepare for the banquet. He puts on fresh tunics and hosiery, powders his mantle with talc, and buffs his shoes. He also polishes his shield and sword; the king likes for his paladins to bring their combat gear to impress the guests.

The banquet begins exactly at seven. About 70 guests are present, including the king and his retinue, various aristocrats and clergymen, and six of the king's paladins, including Jounville. Jounville takes his seat at the furthest end of the table; guests of high status, such the king's family and church dignitaries, sit near the center. A servant brings Jounville his table service, consisting of iron tableware, a manchet (a slab of brread, used as a plate), a glass goblet, and a mazer (a soup bowl trimmed in silver).

Following a benediction and introduction of the guests of honor, servants bring platters heaped with food. The main course includes blankmanger (chicken and rice seasoned with sugar and almonds), mortrews (dumplings made of fish, bread crumbs, and eggs), glazed onions and peas, mustard and wine sauces, and stewed fruit. Jounville follows meticulous rules of etiquette, careful to wipe his spoon after each use and to take small portions.

The meal lasts for two hours. Servants bring water bowls for the guests to wash their hands, then clear the tables. The guests retire to the ball-room for entertainment. Bards and jesters sing songs and tell stories, while the younger guests join hands and dance in a circle. Elder guests play backgammon or chess and catch up on local gossip. Jounville circulates, engaging in polite small talk. Near the end of the evening, Jounville recites a poem composed especially for the occasion, accompanied by a bard who plays the lute.

The entertainment will last until the early hours of the morning. But at 11 o'clock, Jounville approaches an aide and requests permission to be excused. Jounville retires to his quarters, offering a final evening prayer before settling into bed.
(I think this account is harmless and potentially a helpful reference, but there is a fundamental problem. This account seems to portray Sir Jounville as a squire (at best) or perhaps a lowly man-at-arms. Knights were commanders, leaders, and supervisors. A knight might command a shift of the watch. He would apply to his lord (the king in this case) for an excuse.)
Last edited by Harroghty on Fri Jan 30, 2009 12:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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A Day in the Life

Postby Harroghty » Thu Jan 29, 2009 8:47 pm

Madeline of Blackfern (Church Paladin)

Madeline of Blackfern, a paladin in-residence at the Heart's Hope Monastery, begins her daily routine at midnight when she's awakened by the peal of bells from the prayer tower. Madeline rises, puts on a cloth mantle, leather slippers, and a prayer cap, then joins her fellow paladins in the chapel. Madeline recites a long prayer, then goes to the stables to feed and water the monastery's horses, part of her assigned duties. Except for the prayer, Madeline is expected to observe total silence.

Her chores complete, Madeline returns to bed. The bells awaken her again at five. She dresses again, walks silently to the chapel, and listens to the morning sermon. She fills the next two hours with exercise, meditation, and household tasks. A bell signals breakfast, the main meal of the day. Madeline provides her own dishes and tableware, as do all residents of the monastery. Breakfast consists of beef, mutton, bread, and fruit, simply prepared. Leftovers are distributed to poor families in the area.

After breakfast, Madeline receives her orders for the day. Madeline will spend two hours kneading bread dough in the main kitchen, two hours assisting the monastery's blacksmith to forge horseshoes, and the remaining daylight hours patrolling the grounds on foot. Prayer services will be given approximately every three hours, as signaled by bells. Except for emergencies or pre-approved communications, Madeline is expected to remain silent all day.

At eight o'clock, Madeline eats an evening meal of bread and vegetables in the dining hall. She feeds and waters the horses again, then meets with her superior to confess any sins she may have committed during the previous 24 hours. She admits to coveting her friend's new sandals. For penance, the superior orders her to help her friend sweep the stables. Madeline returns to her quarters, kneels at her bed for a final prayer, then catches a few hours of sleep before the bells awaken her at midnight.

(Okay. This is a more tame sort of paladin. My major issue is that this is totally out of whack with the lives of the harsh, religious orders from history (again, Mr. Swan is not an expert, this was written before Google, and it cites Sleeping Beauty as a resource). The Templars did not eat meat as liberally as this order seems to; the Templars (and other such orders) had three organized prayers a day (lauds in the morning, vespers in the "afternoon", and compline at the end of the day). Overall, this isn't terrible as a general guide for what a day-in-the-life might be like.)
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Re: Knights.

Postby Briek » Fri Jan 30, 2009 12:56 am

thanks alot Harroghty for all these post as they have been really useful, isn't the example you just posted out of the complete paladins handbook. I thought it was a bit of a lame example to have it in whats mean't to be the difinative handbook.
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The historic responsibilities of Knights

Postby Harroghty » Fri Jan 30, 2009 3:17 am

I warned you about those last two before hand. Here are some comments on the lifestyle of knights from Ramon Lull's Book of Knighthood and Chivalry (this was translated to English from Catalan in 1484 CE by William Caxton). Lull was an actual knight and a prolific writer. He was also a theologian and philosopher. His general admonition is that "knights by nobility of courage and by force of arms maintain the order of chivalry." This agrees with the anonymous 12th century poem "Ordene de Chevalerie" that states that a knight "In right and justice keepeth all". This not an account of day-to-day life, but rather suggests general pursuits of a knight.

The Education of Squires
The knowledge and school of chivalry is such that the knight makes his son learn in his youth to ride, for if he does not learn it in his youth he shall never learn it in old age. And it behooves that the son of a knight in the time that he is a squire should take on the keeping of a horse. It behooves him also to serve, and that he be the first subject of the lord, for otherwise he will not know the nobility of lordship when he [himself] should become a knight. And therefore every man who would come to knighthood should learn, in his youth, to carve at the table, to serve, to arm and to adoube a knight; for in likewise as a maid will learn how to sew in order to be a tailor or or to be a carpenter that can sew or hew. Likewise it behooves that a noble man who loves the order of chivalry and would be a knight would first have a master who is a knight, for thus it is a dis-covenable thing that a squire should learn the order and nobility of chivalry from any other man than a knight. So very high and honored is the order of chivalry that a squire should suffer himself not only to learn to keep horse and learn to serve a knight, that he go with him to tourneys and to battles; but it is necessary also that he beholds the school of the Order of Knighthood.

That Knights Ought to be Governors of Lands under the Nobles, Kings, Emperor, and all under God
So very noble is the order of chivalry that every knight ought to be a governor of a great country or land. But there have been too many knights, and the land may not suffice to signify that one ought to be the lord of all things...and under the barons ought to be knights, who ought to govern the ordinances of the barons who are in the high degree of chivalry named before, to show excellence, leadership, and the power and the wisdom of our lord glorious God, who is the only God in trinity, who can and may govern all things.

The Knight Must Maintain and Defend his Worldly Lord and the Knights Should Be Judges if They Were More Learned in Wisdom
The office of a knight is to maintain and defend the worldly lord, for a king who has no barons has no power to maintain righteousness in his men without aid and help.... By the knights ought to be maintained and kept justice, for in likewise do the knights have the office to keep them from violence in exercising the deeds of justice.

Knights Must Undertake Such Sports as to Make Themselves Strong in Prowess, Yet Not Forget Their Duties
Knights ought to take coursers to joust and to go to tourneys, hold an open table, to hunt harts, bears, and other wild beasts, for in doing these things the knights exercise themselves to arms and thus maintain the order of knighthood.

The Knight Must Also Practice Such Things as Will Exercise the Soul, as Well as his Body
And therefore the knight who uses the things that pertain to the order of chivalry as touching his body and has none of the virtues that pertain to chivalry as touching the soul is not the friend of the order of knighthood. For if it is were thus, that he made seperation of the virtues...it should signify that the body and chivalry were both together contrary to the soul and to these virtues. And that is false.

The Knight Must Maintain his Land
The office of a knight is to maintain the land, for because of dread of the common people have of the knights, they labor and cultivate the earth, for fear, lest they should be destroyed. And by their dread of the knights they redoubt the kings, princes and lords, by whom they have their power.

A Knight Must Aid his Lord; his Lord Must Foster Chivalry in himself ere he Destroy it in his Subjects
There is no office that he made but that it may be defeated, that would be a thing similar to God (who may not be defeated or destroyed).

The Knight Must Maintain and Defend Women, and Respect and Defend Those Less Powerful Than He
The office of a knight is to maintain and defend women, widows and orphans, men diseased; and those who are neither powerful nor strong. For as custom and reason is that the greatest and most mighty helps the feeble and the lesser, and that they should have recourse to the great.

The Knight Must Possess Such Riches as to Support his Office, Lest he be Forced to Robbery
The office of a knight is to have a castle and horse for to keep the ways and to defend those who labor on the lands and in the earth and they ought have towns and cities to hold right to the people.

Lull, Ramon. trans. William Caxton. ed. Brian R. Price. Ramon Lull's Book of Knighthood and Chivalry. Union City: Chivalry Bookshelf, 2001.
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Knights - What's Missing?

Postby Harroghty » Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:11 am

The recent discussion about blackguards and anti-paladins produced the conclusion that a character in Forgotten Kingdoms can always apply for special roleplay of a knight outside of the coded class of paladin available to lawful good characters of certain faith. What sets a knight apart from a fighter, a ranger, a cleric, or any of the other classes that could potentially complete this kind of special role-play? Below is an excerpt from the article "Knights: Honor and Chivalry in Any D&D Game" by Michael John Tresca that appeared in Dragon #299. Hopefully this helps people to clarify such a request for an application.

Knight - the word brings to mind shining armor, dragons, castles, jousts, crusades, and heroic quests. Dungeons & Dragons contains most of the elements of a knight-themed campaign - medieval armor, mounted combat, and a multitude of fantastic beasts to slay - but there are a few elements missing. This article fills in those gaps so you can start your own knightly adventures and go questing in grand style or simply add a little chivalry to your game.

What's Missing?
Many D&D campaigns have the elements necessary for knightly orders, but they lack the feel and the atmosphere. Similarly, many characters have all the attributes of a knight, but simply calling a character a knight isn't enough. What then, constitutes a knight?

Knights are warriors. Knights specialize in warfare. Although they might possess a variety of other social skills, they are expected to possess the basic abilities of any melee combatant. On the field, they should terrify lesser opponents; regular troops should flee when faced with a contingent of knights.

Knights are elite. Knights are superior in combat and some other quality, be it social, physical, or mental. In some cultures, knights might be considered inherently superior by birth. In others, they might need to train to join a particular order that offers such status. In all cases, knights have qualities that make them better than their fellows, and people look to them in difficult times.

Knights are organized. Knights are elite because they are an ordered, capable force of trained professionals. This organization makes the knights a force to be reckoned with, both physically and politically.

Knights follow a code. Knights are presumed to follow a common set of rules and hold each other up to certain standards. A code makes knights more respectable in the eyes of most people, and it makes them ideal for laying down the law, often with the edge of a blade. Many D&D characters follow a code, paladins being the primary example, but what makes knights different is that all knightly orders, regardless of alignment, share certain aspects of the same code. Establishing a unified code, more than any other element, helps to establish the feel of knighthood.

Tresca, Michael John. "Knights: Honor and Chivalry in Any D&D Game." Dragon, September 2002, 25.
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Knightly (Paladin) Orders

Postby Harroghty » Sun Feb 01, 2009 4:57 am

There are several orders suggested at the end of The Complete Paladin's Handbook (TSR 2147). I believe these orders to be most suitable for paladins in the Forgotten Kingdoms game (as opposed to knights of any other class). A paladin PC is not automatically enrolled in any order when they are dubbed a knight; admission to an order comes to the PC later on as their role-play progresses. The orders currently available are those pertaining to certain churches in game.
These orders are not aligned with any particular church, but rather with an idea or a cause. None of these orders are given geographic references. There are no grandmasters or famous members mentioned. There is some conversation that I have encountered linking one of these orders, The Most Noble Order of the Radiant Heart, to Amn and the city of Athkatla because of its appearance in Baldur's Gate 2 - Shadows of Amn. The only "canon" source for these orders is The Complete Paladin... and it does not mention this sort of detail. It seems that the intention is to provide a framework for DMs to expand on within their own campaigns. Likewise I have provided here only a summary of each order along with their emblems and mottos.

Most Noble Order of the Radiant Heart
The most prestigious of all orders, the Radiant Heart commands respect from the highest ranks of the aristocracy, who regards its members regarded as dignitaries in their own right. [this is original to the text.] The Radiant Heart honors not only distinguished service, but what is perhaps the most remarkable accomplishment of any paladin - a long life. Primarily a social organization, the Radiant Heart holds a lavish feast every spring, held in the castle of a grateful monarch who donates both the labor and the food. In their free time, members counsel younger paladins, serve as government advisors, and officiate at tournaments.
Emblem: A stylized outline of a heart.
Motto: "The courage of one can change the destiny of many."

Radiant Heart Auxiliary
This is the junior wing of the Most Noble Order of the Radiant Heart, organized to honor outstanding young paladins. Like the Most Noble Order, the the auxiliary is a social organization, though its members may occasionally be called upon to serve or assist their sponsors.
Emblem: A heart symbol, similar to that of the Most Noble Order, enclosed in a circle. The symbol is embroidered on a sash or painted on a shield.
Motto: "A loyal heart and a faithful spirit."

Ancient and Revered Order of the Thorn
Second in prestige only to the Order of the Radiant Heart, the Order of the Thorn recognizes service to a church. Membership is extended to those demonstrating exemplary courage in defense of religious principles or church property. Largely an honorary organization, members have no responsibilities other than counseling their congregations and helping church leaders interpret religious doctrine.
Emblem: A long-stemmed rose.
Motto: "Faith is the mother of duty and the father of truth."

Distinguished Order of the Crystal Dawn
An elite organization of land-owners, the Order of the Crystal Dawn recognizes business acumen and successful resource management. It provides investment advice and low-interest loans to its members, and serves the community with charity drives and financial counseling.
Members of the order, having demonstrated financial responsibility throughout their careers, are no longer bound by the paladin's stricture that forbids the accumulation of wealth. However, members are still expected to use their wealth for lawful good purposes, and are not allowed to acquire material possessions merely for the pleasure of ownership.
Emblem: A golden rising sun.
Motto: "Peace from prosperity."

Righteous Order of the Iron Dragon
This order honors outstanding military service. Its members have distinguished themselves through heroism in combat and gallantry on the battlefield. While members have no formal responsibilities, the High Officers occasionally rally them to fight as an elite force in emergencies.
Emblem: The silhouette of a dragon's head, colored dark gray, on a field of red.
Motto: "Peace through strength."

Order of the Divine Hand
This order recognizes excellence in the medical arts. Its members are dedicated healers who exploit their order's prestige to elicit contributions from wealthy patrons. The members use the funds to build and staff hospitals through the world, particularly in rural areas otherwise lacking in medical care. Members oversee these hospitals, priding themselves on offering free services to all, regardless of social rank or religious orientation. The only patients turned away are those of evil alignment.
Emblem: A serpent coiled around a staff.
Motto: "There is no kindnesss more pure than the touch of a healer's hand."

Swan, Rick. The Complete Paladin's Handbook. Random House, 1994.
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Re: Knights.

Postby Briek » Sun Feb 01, 2009 12:21 pm

i have also seen these orders in my copy of the complete paladin but one question. These orders are completely apart from faith orders and any paladin can join? at least that is the assumption.
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Re: Knights.

Postby Larethiel » Sun Feb 01, 2009 1:31 pm

These orders are not aligned with any particular church, but rather with an idea or a cause
Wir stolze Menschenkinder
Sind eitel arme Sünder
Und wissen gar nicht viel,
Wir spinnen Luftgespinste
Und suchen viele Künste
Und kommen weiter von dem Ziel.
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